Source-Standard Media
By Beatrice Obwocha Sandwiched between four estates, Langalanga, Phase 1 and 2 and Racetrack, Racecourse is one of the most popular middle class estates in Nakuru town. With storied flats of two or three floors, this estate boasts of well-constructed and not so crowded residential houses. Built in the 1980s, most of the house units — three to six per plot — are either two or three bed-roomed. Majority are just low house because the Municipal Council discouraged storied buildings due to the soil structure of the area. A business centre near the estate.
Read more at: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/business/article/1144015285/home-to-nakuru-s-middle-class
There are, however, few storied flats coming up but they do not exceed four floors. This probably explains why the estate is popular with the middle class who still cherish the privacy of their small compounds. Others have built homes and have also put up extensions or servant quarters that they rent out for extra cash. foreign influence The rent varies depending on the size of the house with a single room going for between Sh2,500 and Sh3,000. One bed-roomed house is going for between Sh3,500 and Sh4,500 while two bed-roomed house will cost between Sh4,500 and Sh6,000. However, in the recent past, the cost of housing has gone up with some landlords hiking the rent of two bed-roomed houses to between Sh7,000 and Sh8,000 per month. This followed an influx of foreign nationals who flocked the estate and were willing to pay higher rent than locals. Walking around the estate one meets these foreigners, majority of whom are students in colleges in town. Racecourse Estate is also conveniently located near the town, and for only Sh25 one is dropped outside their gate either by bus or matatu. The estate is also near Kanu Street that is home to popular nightclubs and over 60 pubs most of which operate a 24 hour schedule. Racecourse has its own shopping centre known as Zakayos that has mini supermarkets, shops, bars, butcheries, groceries, a drycleaner and a medical clinic. The estate also has some of the most popular schools in Nakuru, Carol Academy and Chrisco Academy. Security in the estate is fairly good but in the recent past residents have complained of numerous carjacking incidents. George Muchiri, a resident, says motorists get carjacked right at their gates by gangsters who hide behind the nearby uncompleted plots. “There are many feeder roads here and carjackers easily hide behind a building and pounce as one waits for the gate to be opened,” he laments. No mugging Incidents of housebreakings and muggings are, however, still rare. The two main streets in the estate, Eldoret and Othaya are well lit with security lights and this probably explains the few muggings. Despite the name, there is no horseracing course here though in the colonial period, it was used for horse racing and carting hence the name. After independence the land was sold to locals who later constructed residential houses. Muchiri says the estate has no water problem but at times there is the usual rationing. A trading centre linking Racecourse with the neighbouring estates. [Photos: Lucas Thuo/ Standard] “The neighbouring estates are the ones with water problem but houses here have water throughout,” says Muchiri. Drainage is good considering the estate is on a hilly area. All roads in the estate are tarmacked except for a few feeder roads to residential houses. Racecourse is located next to Lake Nakuru National Park, which is blocked from view by Honeymoon hill. Wild animals do not stray into the estate except for cheeky baboons that jump over the fence. The baboons do not fear human beings and it is common to find them at St Joseph Catholic Church compound. At times they even invade people’s kitchens. “We have to close our back doors or else you will find baboons have taken off with your food,” Muchiri says.
Read more at: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/business/article/1144015285/home-to-nakuru-s-middle-class
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